31
May
2009
|
04:55 AM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch: Cyber Turf Wars; Social Media ROI; "The Stacker"

Monday 8am Silicon Valley news report:

Does Social Media Need an ROI? No and Yes. -elites tv


Just as a consumer will “tune out” interruption marketing that is too company-centric, corporations will eventually fatigue of soft programs that can’t be tracked to something: improving reputation, increasing awareness, and ultimately driving sales).


Google Analytics for Phone Calls and Chat – How Deep Is Too Deep? -RISMedia


The very first online priority for the future success of the individual real estate professional, and for the brokerage, is a website, blog or both that have comprehensive and useful IDX search and lead generation tools in place.


PROMISES, PROMISES: Battling cyber turf wars -AP


Turf wars between powerful federal departments, including intelligence agencies, the Pentagon and Homeland Security , have also long mired efforts to better coordinate, control and fund the nation's cyber security. Agencies do not want to cede authority to make decisions about what software or hardware they use, how they protect their networks or what new technologies they will research or pursue.


Slowdown, shortages in focus at Computex -Reuters


Mobility will be a key theme at the world's second biggest PC fair this year, and there is likely to be keen interest in super-thin, lightweight laptops designed to cut power consumption and save battery life.


Finding New Employees, via Social Networks -NYTimes


...while some may be disconcerted that software from an unknown company is searching their profiles, Ms. Stone says that most know that information on the Web can be used in ways that people don’t expect, and that LinkedIn, in particular, is built to make professional information available.


Japan university gives away iPhones to nab truants -AP


A prestigious Japanese university is giving away hundreds of iPhones, in part to use its Global Positioning System to nab students that skip class.


Put Ad on Web. Count Clicks. Revise. -NYTimes


This approach turns marketing “upside down,” says Ron Proleika, the vice president of marketing communications at Windstream Communications, an Internet service provider and a client of Mr. Herman’s. “It forces marketers to stay on their toes and think of thousands of small great ideas instead of one great big one."


Would you pay to upload videos to YouTube? -SFGate


As Jeffrey Lindsay, with Sanford Bernstein put it, charging users 5 cents per upload would "stop people from listing rubbish and cover at least some of the hosting cost."


Lights! Camera! Inaction! -NYTimes


As many problems as the Internet presents for traditional forms of representation, every serious journalist and filmmaker misses a big chance when he refuses to contend with it.


In Music, Apple’s Strength Becomes a Vulnerability -GigaOM


On-demand streaming isn’t a perfect science, and Apple’s user experience is still stronger than any application can provide. Nor is multitasking an option with most apps, never mind how much the ones that do can drain a device’s battery life. But as the trend toward streaming music rather than owning it


Cloud Computing: Enter the “Stacker” -GigaOM


The evolution of existing IT components toward the stacker and the separation of virtual and physical design forces provides the opportunity to incorporate these controls into the building blocks of the future service provider cloud.


As Web communication shrinks, so do links -AP


If you're not into the whole brevity thing, there are URL lengtheners, too. DickensURL will convert Web addresses into Charles Dickens passages. Of course, quotes from "Great Expectations" tend to be longer than 140 characters, so DickensURL also offers a compact link, which leaves plenty of room for tweeting.


Time Warner CEO hints at online fees for magazines -AP


Time Warner Inc. Chief Executive Jeffrey Bewkes chimed in Friday with the chorus of publishers wondering how much longer newspapers and magazines can afford to keep giving away their stories on the Internet.