27
September
2007
|
04:31 PM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 9.27.07: Palm offers $100 Centro (after rebate)

Palm introduces $100 Centro

[PC World] Slated to debut on Sprint in October, the Centro is significantly smaller and--after a slew of rebates, at least--cheaper than Treo counterparts that likewise support Sprint's superfast EvDO 3G network. Sprint has a 90-day exclusivity agreement for the Centro.

Halo nets $170m in first day

[Times Online] The total easily exceeded that of Halo 2, which brought in $125 million in 2004, as well as takings of the most popular Hollywood films. More than 1.7 million copies of the game were preordered in America, Microsoft said, and 1.4 million people had gone online to play it since its release on Tuesday morning.

Will iPhone update 'brick' unlocked iPhones?

[Computer World] "WARNING: Apple has discovered that some of the unauthorized unlocking programs available on the Internet may cause irreparable damage to the iPhone's software," the message read. "If you have modified your iPhone's software, applying this software update may result in your iPhone becoming permanently inoperable."

Next up from iRobot: iBabySitter

[AP] It's designed to enable parents on a business trip to feel they're almost at home. For example, a parent could remotely send the wheeled robot into a bedroom, where the children could open a book in front of the robot's camera. The parent could then read the story aloud and watch and hear the kids' reactions. The family could also converse.

Amazon store better than iTunes

[Salon] All of Amazon's tracks are sold as unrestricted MP3s, free of Digital Rights Management, or DRM -- they will work on just about any music player in the world, including an iPod. The store marks iTunes' first real competition. In fact, I think it kicks iTunes' buttons.

MSFT TV networking devices for Media Center

[InfoWeek] Microsoft (NSDQ: MSFT) on Thursday introduced Linksys, D-Link, and Niveus Media products that would distribute high-definition video from a Windows Media Center PC to any home TV with a wired or wireless network connection.

AOL patching AIM flaw

[InfoWeek] This vulnerability poses a significant security risk to millions of AIM users," said Ivan Arce, CTO at Core Security, in a written statement. "Core Security has alerted AOL to this threat and has provided full technical details about the vulnerability so that they can address it in their products.