12
July
2007
|
04:07 PM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 7.12.07: Court turns down net radio

Court declines to save Net radio

[The Register] The Internet radio death watch continues. Late yesterday, a federal appeals court denied an emergency stay petition from webcasters, refusing to delay the arrival of massive royalty hikes that threaten to bring down online radio as we know it. The new royalty rates are due to kick in on Sunday. The stay was rejected with a single sentence from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. "Petitioners have not satisfied the stringent standards required for a stay pending court review," the order read.

GOOG lets users mash up their own maps

[Reuters] MyMaps, as the new feature is known, allows consumers to select from more than one hundred mini-applications created by independent software developers. These allow users to overlay data on top of Google's popular online map service.

Facebook ads performing poorly

[Mashable] After toying around with its ads, Reach Students found that the clickthrough rate was only about 0.04%, with 1.4 million page impressions. Turns out, this low clickthrough rate has been the case for nearly every company that advertises on Facebook with both banners and flyers.

Audiobook selelr MediaBay shuts down

[DigMedWire]ediaBay, a provider of spoken word audio content that has been seeking a buyer since early last year, announced that it is ceasing operations.

MSFT, Mozilla squabble over Firefox flaw

[Computerworld] The debate over who is at fault for a Windows zero-day vulnerability continues, with Microsoft saying it's not responsible for the issue and Mozilla making plans to patch Firefox -- even though it accepts no blame for the flaw, either.

New iPhone rumor: APPL will release iPhone-like iPod

[Computerworld] Maybe this is what Morgan's Chang was seeing in the patent filings: 'Reports from Taiwan suggest that Apple may launch next month a new iPod that looks, feels and works like an iPhone, but without the phone part.'

And how much do I hear for this security hole?

[WaPo] A Swiss Internet start-up is raising the ire and eyebrows of the computer security community with the launch of an online auction house where software vulnerabilities are sold to the highest bidder.

Intel Classmate PC gives world's kids the laptop they need

[WaPo] The most interesting new laptop shipped so far this year isn't sold in the United States. It's also missing most of the standard parts of a computer: a modem, a CD burner, even a hard drive.