02
January
2008
|
01:19 PM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 1.2.08: OLPC sued for $20 million

Qualcomm infringed on patents

[Reuters] Qualcomm Inc said on Wednesday it would be hurt in the short term by a court injunction on the sale of chips infringing rival Broadcom Corp's patents, but it promised to have alternative products in phones before the end of the quarter.

$40 coupons to convert to digital broadcasts

[Wired] Aided by the billions it's expected to rake in after this month's 700 MHz spectrum auction, the government officially started issuing $40 coupons on Wednesday to go toward the purchase of digital conversion boxes.

New flash drive includes Web backup

[Reuters] When consumers store documents, photos and music onto SanDisk's new Cruzer Titanium Plus USB flash drive, it will back up that digital information to a Web service offered by a start-up company called BeInSync, which stores data onto Amazon.com Inc's computers.

Wikia Search goes public alpha Monday

[News.com] Wikia Search, which aims to allow people to contribute to how pages are ranked and to edit search results, will have open-source search algorithms and application program interfaces.

Nigerian company sues OLPC for $20m

[GrokLaw] Maybe this doomed litigation effort will last just long enough for a Nigerian knockoff of the OLPC, or the OLPC on Intel, to become ready for release. Maybe it's just about money a couple of guys want. Who knows why people do things like this? I have the filings for you, so you can draw your own conclusions. So, here we go. Your first binary moment of 2008. It's laugh or cry.

Data breaches set record in '07

[InfoWeek] The number of publicly reported data breaches in the U.S. rose by more than 40% in 2007, compared to the previous year, according to statistics compiled by the Identity Theft Resource Center.

Tablet ModBook ships

[Macworld] Starting with a stock Apple MacBook laptop, Axiotron has designed a new case and a new input system, eschewing the keyboard and trackpad instead for a stylus input that enables users to write directly on the screen. It's the first pen tablet-based Mac.