02
October
2007
|
11:57 AM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 10.2.07: YHOO's search breakthrough

Toshiba to ship OLED screens in 09

[PCW] Toshiba Corp. plans to begin selling televisions with OLED (organic light-emitting diodes) screens as soon as panels are ready, according to a company spokeswoman. The first Toshiba OLED television sets should hit the market in 2009, said Yuko Sugahara.

DHS holds off on sharing high-res sat images

[ZDNet] Monday was supposed to be the day that the Department of Homeland Security began sharing its detailed spy satellite images with a range of government agencies. But DHS is delaying the launch — revealed by the Wall Street Journal in August — as Democrats voice concerns about the program.

iRate buyer sues Apple for $1m

[The Times] Dongmei Li, of New York, who waited "for hours" to buy a 4GB version of the iPhone in July three days after its debut, is accusing Apple of "price discrimination, underselling, discrimination in rebates, deceptive actions and other wrongdoings," according to a filing by her attorney, C Jean Wang, of Wang Law Offices.

Adobe's software-as-service strategy

[PCW] Chizen would never be caught mouthing the "Software + Services" catchphrase pounded into the ground by Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. But he is steering Adobe in the same direction that Ballmer is pointing Microsoft.

Nokia buys Navteq for $8 billion

[NYT] Nokia’s plans to acquire the map and navigational software maker Navteq for $8.1 billion raise the stakes in the competition among wireless carriers, handset makers and new entrants like Google and Microsoft to deliver information and advertising directly to cellphone users.

Not enough Wiis for holidays

[GameSpot] "We have been sold out worldwide since we launched," Reggie Fils-Amie boasted. "Every time we put more into the marketplace, we sell more, which says that we are not even close to understanding where the threshold is between supply and demand...Our inventory is lasting a day."

Yahoo offers Search Assist to help divine user intent

"We know that consumers want a complete answer, not a bunch of links, and the changes we've made are focused on getting people to the best answer -- whether it be a Web link, photo, video or music clip -- in one search," said Vish Makhijani, general manager and senior vice president of Yahoo! Search.