15
October
2007
|
09:58 AM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 10.15.07: Hard-drive breakthrough

Hitachi breakthrough will mean terabytes in your hand

[HalfLifeSource] Hitachi announced a new breakthrough in technology storage by developing the world's smallest read/write head for hard drives. The name for the storage device is dubbed, "Current Perpendicular-to-the-Plane Giant Magneto-Resistive" or CPP-GMR head.

13-year-old jailbreaks iPod Touch

[MacObserver] A 13 year old that goes by the handle AriX has managed to produce a simple to use jailbreak method for the iPod touch called iJailBreak. AriX's hack allows iPod touch users to install third-party applications on their touch interface iPod, and does not require any special skills to use.

Porn spammers get five years

[EastValleyTribune] The case, investigated by the FBI and the Justice Department’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, was the first to include charges under the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003, the Justice Department said in a statement. The act was designed to crack down on the transmission of pornography in commercial bulk unsolicited e-mail messages.

Universal takes on Apple

[BizWeek] BusinessWeek has learned that Morris has already enlisted Sony BMG Music Entertainment as a potential partner and is talking to Warner Music Group. Together the three would control about 75% of the music sold in the U.S. Besides competing head-on with Apple Inc.'s music store, Morris and his allies hope to move digital music beyond the iPod-iTunes universe by nurturing the likes of Microsoft's Zune media player and Sony's PlayStation and by working with the wireless carriers.

Linux cos. sued for patent infringement

[News.com] Although I and many attorneys in the open-source industry have long been concerned about patent challenges to open-source companies, this case appears to be the first by patent trolls against an open-source licensor," said Mark Radcliffe, a DLA Piper intellectual property attorney.

Pentagon promotes space-based solar power

[Newsfactor] Huge solar arrays placed into a continuously and intensely sunlit orbit around the earth would be able to generate gigawatts of electrical energy that could be electromagnetically beamed back to earth. The receiving stations down on the ground would be designed to deliver the power to the existing electrical grid.

YouTube layers videos onto Google Earth

[VNUNet] For example, a trip to Maui offers videos of surfing, snorkelling and exotic sea life, while users who fly to Chamonix-Mont Blanc in France can watch videos filmed at the highest points of the Alps.