11
October
2007
|
12:52 PM
America/Los_Angeles

Newswatch 10.11.07: iPhone hackers strike back

iPhone hackers strike back

[News.com] Two weeks to the day after Apple's iPhone software update wiped third-party applications from the device and disabled unlocked phones, the hackers have struck back. The latest hack allows iPhone users who have already installed the OS X 1.1.1 update to revert their iPhones to the previous 1.0.2 update, "jailbreak" it for third-party applications, and then somehow update back to the 1.1.1 version without the cell door slamming shut.

IBM, Linden cooperate on virtual standards

[Newsfactor] Currently, users have to create separate avatars for each virtual world they want to inhabit, but a universal avatar would allow users to create one once and use it across VR worlds. "It's an obstacle to the development and spread of virtual worlds, both in the consumer and corporate space," said Colin Parris, IBM's VP of digital convergence.

Firefox mobile: too little too late?

[Ars Technica] If Mozilla can bring the quality and flexibility of the Firefox desktop experience to the mobile platform without having to sacrifice distinctive features like add-on support, it will be a huge win for open-source mobile web browsing. This will not be an easy task, and strong competition in the mobile space already exists from WebKit and Opera—and even Internet Explorer.

Analyst mom to Ballmer: Vista sucks

[PCW] "I'm one of those early adopters of Vista," said Yvonne Genovese, an analyst who was interviewing Ballmer along with fellow analyst David Smith on stage at a conference forum. "My daughter comes in one day and says, 'Hey Mom, my friend has Vista, and it has these neat little things called gadgets -- I need those.'" Said Ballmer: "I love your daughter." "You're not going to like her mom in about two minutes," said Genovese, while the crowd laughed.

GOOG leads in global search

[BBC] Korea's NHN was the fifth most used search engine, according to the story, just behind Microsoft. The study revealed that most search activity happens in the Asia-Pacific region, which includes countries such as China, Japan and India.

Paul Allen launches alien-hunting array

[Space.com] Allen will be inaugurating the initial 42 antennas of his namesake, the Allen Telescope Array (ATA) – the first major radio telescope designed from the pedestal up to efficiently (which is to say, rapidly) chew its way through long lists of stars in a search for alien signals.

China repressed iPod sweatshop report

[PCW] The allegations are contained in a 17-page report by Paris-based Reporters Without Borders, Journey to the heart of internet censorship, produced in cooperation with Chinese Human Rights Defenders and an anonymous "Chinese technician working in the internet sector."

Bush threatens veto if telecoms don't get immunity

[ZDNet] President Bush warned two House committees that he would veto any intelligence bill that failed to give full immunity to telecom companies who cooperate with intelligence agencies. The House Judiciary and Intelligence committees approved bills that would require the government to get court orders before it could conduct blanket surveillance of overseas targets.

BP is SimCity's alternative energy provider

[Environmental Leader] Electronic Arts and BP have collaborated to include climate change education within SimCity Societies, the next iteration of the city-building game. BP’s logo appears in the game as a provider of alternative energy.